The Music Workshop Company Blog 

Each month the Music Workshop Company publishes two blogs. One blog, written by the MWC team addresses a key issue in Music Education or gives information about a particular genre or period of music. The other blog is written by a guest writer, highlighting good practice or key events in Music Education. We hope you enjoy reading the blogs. 
 
We embed multimedia content in many of our blog posts, if you have rejected cookies for this website, you may have white spaces where the multimedia content should be. This is due to a recent change of policy by YouTube, Spotify and other platforms. We are in the process of updating all our posts. If you come across white spaces in a blog post, you can open the link in another browser or private browser and approve cookies to access all the content. We are sorry for any inconvenience this causes. 
 
To contribute as a guest writer please email Maria@music-workshop.co.uk 

Posts tagged “MUSIC EDUCATION FUNDING”

Image: Caleb George, Unsplash 
This summer, the Government published its National Plan for Music Education, known in Music Education circles as the NPME. Its full, bold title is ‘The power of music to change lives: a National Plan for Music Education’ – but can it live up to this ambition?  
 
As schools head back after the summer holidays, how might the NPME for England influence their thinking and their planning? And crucially, do they have the resources to put it into action? 
 
Maria Thomas, MWC’s Artistic Director, gives her view.  
As schools return in Wales, they will begin implementing the new Music in Schools programme, part of the National Plan for Music Education that was announced in May. A key element of the plan is the establishment of a National Music Service. 
 
MWC’s Artistic Director, Maria Thomas, gives her opinion on the plan. 
In an extremely troubling move that will further sideline arts education in England, the Government has confirmed that it will be cutting the teaching grant (T-grant) for Higher Education arts by a devastating 50% this coming academic year.  
 
This is despite the results of the Government’s own consultation in which 95% respondents strongly disagreed with the cut, strong opposition across the creative industries and education, and a petition from the Public Campaign for the Arts which has generated more than 166,000 signatures. 
 
Earlier this month, the Durham Commission published its final report following a two-year review of Creativity in Education. The Commission is a collaboration between Arts Council England and Durham University. It aims to identify ways in which creativity, and specifically creative thinking, can play a larger part in the lives of young people from birth to the age of 19, both within and beyond the current education system. 

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